mid September news

My most recent excitement comes from SUCCESS in a ‘sprang’ experiment. I have been intrigued by images in Peter Collingwood’s book The Techniques of Sprang. Diamond and zigzag patterns in sashes pictured there are pretty straight forward. I’ve developed a method for mapping out the patterns on graph paper, then translating the graphs to written patterns, such as 6 singles, 1 double, 4 singles, etc.

The challenge to myself was to work out the pattern for the two-headed eagle from the 1700 Dutch piece at the back of the book.

I am Thrilled to report that my experiment was a success!

double headed eagle pattern in silk sprang

double headed eagle pattern in silk sprang

The material is a medium silk cord from Treenway’s. I dyed it with a ‘plum’ Landscapes dye. I will bring this piece along with me to Mississinewa 1812 in Marion, Indiana, this October. Stop by and have a look.

Now I didn’t start out with this piece. I’ve been working on this mapping and pattern-writing technique for sprang, creating ‘neck scarfs’.

pattern trials, sprang scarfs

pattern trials, sprang scarfs

Folks might want to know, the sprang always wants to curl at first (the red and yellow one at the top of the picture). I find that if I wash it, and pat it flat, and leave it to dry, then it ‘forgets’ the need to curl.

Guess it’s been a while since I’ve blogged, and there are a few other things to report.

I attended the Manitoba Living History Society’s Fall Gathering, September 5 to 7.

View of the camp, MLHS Fall Gathering

View of the camp, MLHS Fall Gathering

I had prepared some indigo dye and took advantage of the space and time to dye some two dozen skeins, mostly white, but some were yellow. As predicted, they came out a variety of blues and greens.

A magic transformation as they emerge from the pot, changing from yellow to green to bright blue, it was lovely to see.

wool emerges from the indigo dyepot a yellow-green

wool emerges from the indigo dyepot a yellow-green

and then it immediately starts turning blue

the indigo dye oxidizes and turns blue

the indigo dye oxidizes and turns blue

By the end of the weekend I had a lovely set of blues

variety of blue and green wool

variety of blue and green wool

On Sept 12, a new park was dedicated to the honor of a locally prominent Métis, Elzéar Goulet. What an honor to see my sashes all around. Of the 6 sashes visible in this photo, I had a hand in the creation of 4 of them.

Dedication of the Elzéar Goulet Park

Dedication of the Elzéar Goulet Park

As well, I’ve been busy on my loom. A desperate call from a friend, the need for a sash for another inductee into an esteemed position, requiring another sash:

special order special pattern sash

special order special pattern sash

Working on a woven silk ‘officer’s sash’.

I’ll be in Marion, Indiana, Oct 10 to 12 for Mississinewa 1812.

November 7 to 9, I’ll be in Thunder Bay, Ontario, for the NAVC Fall Gathering.

Meanwhile, there will be another ‘Beginning Fingerweaving’ class at the Musée de St Boniface Museum, starting Sunday afternoons. Contact the Musée for further information.

info@msbm.mb.ca

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