St Paul to Durango

I’ve been busy teaching. The Midwest Handweavers Conference was held at St Thomas College in St Paul, Minnesota. I taught a finger weaving class and then a sprang class. On the way to Minnesota I stopped in Fargo to visit. Kim Baird said I should look up another instructor while there, Donna Kallner. Arriving at St Thomas College, I was assigned a roommate … none other than Donna Kallner.

Finger Weaving students in St Paul, Minnesota

Finger Weaving students in St Paul, Minnesota use a coat rack to suspend the warps.

What a lovely campus, and terrific vendor’s hall. I found just the yarn I was looking for, the right size yarn to work a more authentic version of that Coptic sprang turban.

Back home, I’m working on yet another pair of sprang leggings. These will hopefully be more accurate to that portrait of a Venetian gondolier.

leggings in progress, diamonds at the thigh

leggings in progress, diamonds at the thigh

Not quite sufficient time to finish those leggings, and I’m off to Colorado and the Intermountain Weavers Conference in Durango where I taught a three-day sprang workshop. Great to catch up with former students.

Carolyn Wise showed me her most recent sprang work, an interlaced neckscarf.

Carolyn Wise showed me her most recent sprang work, an interlaced neckscarf.

And there was a batch of new sprang students

Sprang class in Durango at the Intermountain Weavers Conference

Sprang class in Durango at the Intermountain Weavers Conference

The lovely thing about a three-day workshop is that students are supported through the learning process. By the third day some really creative things can happen. After the initial bag, and a circular warp lace sampler, and some exploration of twining, some students were ready to explore.

A funky 3-d braided piece by Sally

A funky 3-d braided piece by Sally

We were looking at images on the internet of wildly braided sprang pieces. Sally offered to use her piece to explore this method. We began the process in class. Recently she sent me this image of the completed piece. You see, sprang is so much more than ugly bags and hats.

After the conference I had the opportunity to tour Mesa Verde, Canyon de Chelly, and Bandelier National Monument, sites of ancient cliff dwellings. One room was clearly set up for weaving, a place for the upper beam in the ceiling, loops to hold the lower beam in the floor. Thanks to Laurie Webster and Glenna Dean for being my tour guides.

In other news, I’ve been working on a collection of sprang lace patterns.

Lace sample from the Museum of Art and History in Brussels, Belgium

Lace sample from the Museum of Art and History in Brussels, Belgium

I’m looking for individuals interested in trying out my lace patterns, giving me feed-back on the readability of the patterns. Any takers out there? Send me a note, carol at sash weaver dot com.

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